Report: Industrial Internet Leads to ‘Profound Transformation’ in Way Humans Work

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This blog was originally posted on GE's Ideas Lab.

Ending inefficiencies in how information is gathered, stored, accessed and shared when repairing and maintaining the turbines used in a handful of major industries—like power generation, railroads, aviation and healthcare—could save 300 million man-hours a year—or savings of about $20 billion—according to a GE report released today.

The savings are owed to the power of the Industrial Internet, which the report says is bringing about a “profound transformation” in the way humans and machines collaborate.  “A new, highly skilled workforce will emerge as the Industrial Internet unleashes a new standard in efficiency that saves entire industries billions of dollars in unplanned downtime and turns industrial operators into skilled information-workers,” said Marco Annunziata, co-author of the report, The Industrial Internet@Work, along with GE’s Director of Global Strategy and Analytics Peter C. Evans.

“Discussions of the Industrial Internet tend to focus on the machines and the data, but people at work are an equally essential element of this revolution,” the report says.  And it’s “exactly” by changing the way people work that the Industrial Internet will deliver its greatest benefits, the report says.

For example, a combined cycle gas turbine maintenance manual clocks in at 1,000 pages, about the length of a small-type version of “War and Peace.” Maintenance workers often have to haul the manuals from one location to another. But with the Industrial Internet, those workers will be able to access all of this information on a simple handheld device, while also brainstorm repairs with colleagues and even virtually monitor the sophisticated sensors in the actual turbines.

Gas turbine maintenance workers do much of their service work on set timetables and lack real-time information about the condition of the turbine parts that might help them avoid a mad scramble to service an unscheduled repair. As a result, “unplanned downtime causes economic losses that ripple across the system: power outages, grounded airplanes causing a domino effect of re-scheduling, delayed freight deliveries wreaking havoc in supply chains,” the report says.

Information Becomes Intelligent
“A key feature of the Industrial Internet is that information itself becomes intelligent,” the report says. “When workers need it, information will find them—they will not need to hunt for it.”

The authors argue that the Industrial Internet will change the work experience for hundreds of thousands of workers, from field engineers and drilling rig workers to pilots, doctors and nurses.

“The Industrial Internet will empower [workers] with faster access to relevant information, relying on analytics generating new insights, mobile collaboration tools revolutionizing the way that information is shared and disseminated,” the report says. “Machines will play an active part in this; connected and communicative machines will be able to self-monitor, self-heal, and proactively send information to other machines and to their human partners.”

All this will cultivate an environment of preventive maintenance based on “the actual conditions of industrial assets, bringing us toward a world of ‘no unplanned downtime,’” the report says.

For example, sometime in the near future, a wind farm engineer will travel with a wireless device that can indicate which turbine needs routine maintenance and which needs to be fixed. The same device will store and transmit technical information and enable the engineer to share video with colleagues at other locations to instantly tap their expertise.

Will “smart” machines make people redundant? The authors don’t think so, instead, education will be key, and that companies must play a pivotal role in this area.

“A new, highly-skilled workforce will emerge as the Industrial Internet is poised to have a significant impact,” the report says.  The innovations discussed in the paper will “augment and enhance the abilities of workers, enabling them to work with greater efficiency, better results, and greater productivity,” and turning “industrial operators into skilled information-workers,” the report says.

Annunziata and Evans write about these future human-machine collaborations this way: “Workers will be racing with the new, intelligent machines of the Industrial Internet, not against them—more Iron Man than the Charlie Chaplin of Modern Times.”

 

Ending inefficiencies in how information is gathered, stored, accessed and shared when repairing and maintaining the turbines used in a handful of major industries—like power generation, railroads, aviation and healthcare—could save 300 million man-hours a year—or savings of about $20 billion—according to a GE report released today.

The savings are owed to the power of the Industrial Internet, which the report says is bringing about a “profound transformation” in the way humans and machines collaborate.  “A new, highly skilled workforce will emerge as the Industrial Internet unleashes a new standard in efficiency that saves entire industries billions of dollars in unplanned downtime and turns industrial operators into skilled information-workers,” said Marco Annunziata, co-author of the report, The Industrial Internet@Work, along with GE’s Director of Global Strategy and Analytics Peter C. Evans.

“Discussions of the Industrial Internet tend to focus on the machines and the data, but people at work are an equally essential element of this revolution,” the report says.  And it’s “exactly” by changing the way people work that the Industrial Internet will deliver its greatest benefits, the report says.

For example, a combined cycle gas turbine maintenance manual clocks in at 1,000 pages, about the length of a small-type version of “War and Peace.” Maintenance workers often have to haul the manuals from one location to another. But with the Industrial Internet, those workers will be able to access all of this information on a simple handheld device, while also brainstorm repairs with colleagues and even virtually monitor the sophisticated sensors in the actual turbines.

Gas turbine maintenance workers do much of their service work on set timetables and lack real-time information about the condition of the turbine parts that might help them avoid a mad scramble to service an unscheduled repair. As a result, “unplanned downtime causes economic losses that ripple across the system: power outages, grounded airplanes causing a domino effect of re-scheduling, delayed freight deliveries wreaking havoc in supply chains,” the report says.

Information Becomes Intelligent
“A key feature of the Industrial Internet is that information itself becomes intelligent,” the report says. “When workers need it, information will find them—they will not need to hunt for it.”

The authors argue that the Industrial Internet will change the work experience for hundreds of thousands of workers, from field engineers and drilling rig workers to pilots, doctors and nurses.

“The Industrial Internet will empower [workers] with faster access to relevant information, relying on analytics generating new insights, mobile collaboration tools revolutionizing the way that information is shared and disseminated,” the report says. “Machines will play an active part in this; connected and communicative machines will be able to self-monitor, self-heal, and proactively send information to other machines and to their human partners.”

All this will cultivate an environment of preventive maintenance based on “the actual conditions of industrial assets, bringing us toward a world of ‘no unplanned downtime,’” the report says.

For example, sometime in the near future, a wind farm engineer will travel with a wireless device that can indicate which turbine needs routine maintenance and which needs to be fixed. The same device will store and transmit technical information and enable the engineer to share video with colleagues at other locations to instantly tap their expertise.

Will “smart” machines make people redundant? The authors don’t think so, instead, education will be key, and that companies must play a pivotal role in this area.

“A new, highly-skilled workforce will emerge as the Industrial Internet is poised to have a significant impact,” the report says.  The innovations discussed in the paper will “augment and enhance the abilities of workers, enabling them to work with greater efficiency, better results, and greater productivity,” and turning “industrial operators into skilled information-workers,” the report says.

Annunziata and Evans write about these future human-machine collaborations this way: “Workers will be racing with the new, intelligent machines of the Industrial Internet, not against them—more Iron Man than the Charlie Chaplin of Modern Times.”

- See more at: http://www.ideaslaboratory.com/2013/10/08/report-industrial-internet-leads-to-profound-transformation-in-way-humans-work/#sthash.VkagAxiu.dpuf

Industrial Internet, predictive analytics and new machine-human collaboration can save $20 billion a year across major industries.

Ending inefficiencies in how information is gathered, stored, accessed and shared when repairing and maintaining the turbines used in a handful of major industries—like power generation, railroads, aviation and healthcare—could save 300 million man-hours a year—or savings of about $20 billion—according to a GE report released today.

The savings are owed to the power of the Industrial Internet, which the report says is bringing about a “profound transformation” in the way humans and machines collaborate.  “A new, highly skilled workforce will emerge as the Industrial Internet unleashes a new standard in efficiency that saves entire industries billions of dollars in unplanned downtime and turns industrial operators into skilled information-workers,” said Marco Annunziata, co-author of the report, The Industrial Internet@Work, along with GE’s Director of Global Strategy and Analytics Peter C. Evans.

“Discussions of the Industrial Internet tend to focus on the machines and the data, but people at work are an equally essential element of this revolution,” the report says.  And it’s “exactly” by changing the way people work that the Industrial Internet will deliver its greatest benefits, the report says.

For example, a combined cycle gas turbine maintenance manual clocks in at 1,000 pages, about the length of a small-type version of “War and Peace.” Maintenance workers often have to haul the manuals from one location to another. But with the Industrial Internet, those workers will be able to access all of this information on a simple handheld device, while also brainstorm repairs with colleagues and even virtually monitor the sophisticated sensors in the actual turbines.

Gas turbine maintenance workers do much of their service work on set timetables and lack real-time information about the condition of the turbine parts that might help them avoid a mad scramble to service an unscheduled repair. As a result, “unplanned downtime causes economic losses that ripple across the system: power outages, grounded airplanes causing a domino effect of re-scheduling, delayed freight deliveries wreaking havoc in supply chains,” the report says.

Information Becomes Intelligent
“A key feature of the Industrial Internet is that information itself becomes intelligent,” the report says. “When workers need it, information will find them—they will not need to hunt for it.”

The authors argue that the Industrial Internet will change the work experience for hundreds of thousands of workers, from field engineers and drilling rig workers to pilots, doctors and nurses.

“The Industrial Internet will empower [workers] with faster access to relevant information, relying on analytics generating new insights, mobile collaboration tools revolutionizing the way that information is shared and disseminated,” the report says. “Machines will play an active part in this; connected and communicative machines will be able to self-monitor, self-heal, and proactively send information to other machines and to their human partners.”

All this will cultivate an environment of preventive maintenance based on “the actual conditions of industrial assets, bringing us toward a world of ‘no unplanned downtime,’” the report says.

For example, sometime in the near future, a wind farm engineer will travel with a wireless device that can indicate which turbine needs routine maintenance and which needs to be fixed. The same device will store and transmit technical information and enable the engineer to share video with colleagues at other locations to instantly tap their expertise.

Will “smart” machines make people redundant? The authors don’t think so, instead, education will be key, and that companies must play a pivotal role in this area.

“A new, highly-skilled workforce will emerge as the Industrial Internet is poised to have a significant impact,” the report says.  The innovations discussed in the paper will “augment and enhance the abilities of workers, enabling them to work with greater efficiency, better results, and greater productivity,” and turning “industrial operators into skilled information-workers,” the report says.

Annunziata and Evans write about these future human-machine collaborations this way: “Workers will be racing with the new, intelligent machines of the Industrial Internet, not against them—more Iron Man than the Charlie Chaplin of Modern Times.”

- See more at: http://www.ideaslaboratory.com/2013/10/08/report-industrial-internet-leads-to-profound-transformation-in-way-humans-work/#sthash.VkagAxiu.dpuf

Industrial Internet, predictive analytics and new machine-human collaboration can save $20 billion a year across major industries.

Ending inefficiencies in how information is gathered, stored, accessed and shared when repairing and maintaining the turbines used in a handful of major industries—like power generation, railroads, aviation and healthcare—could save 300 million man-hours a year—or savings of about $20 billion—according to a GE report released today.

The savings are owed to the power of the Industrial Internet, which the report says is bringing about a “profound transformation” in the way humans and machines collaborate.  “A new, highly skilled workforce will emerge as the Industrial Internet unleashes a new standard in efficiency that saves entire industries billions of dollars in unplanned downtime and turns industrial operators into skilled information-workers,” said Marco Annunziata, co-author of the report, The Industrial Internet@Work, along with GE’s Director of Global Strategy and Analytics Peter C. Evans.

“Discussions of the Industrial Internet tend to focus on the machines and the data, but people at work are an equally essential element of this revolution,” the report says.  And it’s “exactly” by changing the way people work that the Industrial Internet will deliver its greatest benefits, the report says.

For example, a combined cycle gas turbine maintenance manual clocks in at 1,000 pages, about the length of a small-type version of “War and Peace.” Maintenance workers often have to haul the manuals from one location to another. But with the Industrial Internet, those workers will be able to access all of this information on a simple handheld device, while also brainstorm repairs with colleagues and even virtually monitor the sophisticated sensors in the actual turbines.

Gas turbine maintenance workers do much of their service work on set timetables and lack real-time information about the condition of the turbine parts that might help them avoid a mad scramble to service an unscheduled repair. As a result, “unplanned downtime causes economic losses that ripple across the system: power outages, grounded airplanes causing a domino effect of re-scheduling, delayed freight deliveries wreaking havoc in supply chains,” the report says.

Information Becomes Intelligent
“A key feature of the Industrial Internet is that information itself becomes intelligent,” the report says. “When workers need it, information will find them—they will not need to hunt for it.”

The authors argue that the Industrial Internet will change the work experience for hundreds of thousands of workers, from field engineers and drilling rig workers to pilots, doctors and nurses.

“The Industrial Internet will empower [workers] with faster access to relevant information, relying on analytics generating new insights, mobile collaboration tools revolutionizing the way that information is shared and disseminated,” the report says. “Machines will play an active part in this; connected and communicative machines will be able to self-monitor, self-heal, and proactively send information to other machines and to their human partners.”

All this will cultivate an environment of preventive maintenance based on “the actual conditions of industrial assets, bringing us toward a world of ‘no unplanned downtime,’” the report says.

For example, sometime in the near future, a wind farm engineer will travel with a wireless device that can indicate which turbine needs routine maintenance and which needs to be fixed. The same device will store and transmit technical information and enable the engineer to share video with colleagues at other locations to instantly tap their expertise.

Will “smart” machines make people redundant? The authors don’t think so, instead, education will be key, and that companies must play a pivotal role in this area.

“A new, highly-skilled workforce will emerge as the Industrial Internet is poised to have a significant impact,” the report says.  The innovations discussed in the paper will “augment and enhance the abilities of workers, enabling them to work with greater efficiency, better results, and greater productivity,” and turning “industrial operators into skilled information-workers,” the report says.

Annunziata and Evans write about these future human-machine collaborations this way: “Workers will be racing with the new, intelligent machines of the Industrial Internet, not against them—more Iron Man than the Charlie Chaplin of Modern Times.”

- See more at: http://www.ideaslaboratory.com/2013/10/08/report-industrial-internet-leads-to-profound-transformation-in-way-humans-work/#sthash.VkagAxiu.dpuf

Industrial Internet, predictive analytics and new machine-human collaboration can save $20 billion a year across major industries.

Ending inefficiencies in how information is gathered, stored, accessed and shared when repairing and maintaining the turbines used in a handful of major industries—like power generation, railroads, aviation and healthcare—could save 300 million man-hours a year—or savings of about $20 billion—according to a GE report released today.

The savings are owed to the power of the Industrial Internet, which the report says is bringing about a “profound transformation” in the way humans and machines collaborate.  “A new, highly skilled workforce will emerge as the Industrial Internet unleashes a new standard in efficiency that saves entire industries billions of dollars in unplanned downtime and turns industrial operators into skilled information-workers,” said Marco Annunziata, co-author of the report, The Industrial Internet@Work, along with GE’s Director of Global Strategy and Analytics Peter C. Evans.

“Discussions of the Industrial Internet tend to focus on the machines and the data, but people at work are an equally essential element of this revolution,” the report says.  And it’s “exactly” by changing the way people work that the Industrial Internet will deliver its greatest benefits, the report says.

For example, a combined cycle gas turbine maintenance manual clocks in at 1,000 pages, about the length of a small-type version of “War and Peace.” Maintenance workers often have to haul the manuals from one location to another. But with the Industrial Internet, those workers will be able to access all of this information on a simple handheld device, while also brainstorm repairs with colleagues and even virtually monitor the sophisticated sensors in the actual turbines.

Gas turbine maintenance workers do much of their service work on set timetables and lack real-time information about the condition of the turbine parts that might help them avoid a mad scramble to service an unscheduled repair. As a result, “unplanned downtime causes economic losses that ripple across the system: power outages, grounded airplanes causing a domino effect of re-scheduling, delayed freight deliveries wreaking havoc in supply chains,” the report says.

Information Becomes Intelligent
“A key feature of the Industrial Internet is that information itself becomes intelligent,” the report says. “When workers need it, information will find them—they will not need to hunt for it.”

The authors argue that the Industrial Internet will change the work experience for hundreds of thousands of workers, from field engineers and drilling rig workers to pilots, doctors and nurses.

“The Industrial Internet will empower [workers] with faster access to relevant information, relying on analytics generating new insights, mobile collaboration tools revolutionizing the way that information is shared and disseminated,” the report says. “Machines will play an active part in this; connected and communicative machines will be able to self-monitor, self-heal, and proactively send information to other machines and to their human partners.”

All this will cultivate an environment of preventive maintenance based on “the actual conditions of industrial assets, bringing us toward a world of ‘no unplanned downtime,’” the report says.

For example, sometime in the near future, a wind farm engineer will travel with a wireless device that can indicate which turbine needs routine maintenance and which needs to be fixed. The same device will store and transmit technical information and enable the engineer to share video with colleagues at other locations to instantly tap their expertise.

Will “smart” machines make people redundant? The authors don’t think so, instead, education will be key, and that companies must play a pivotal role in this area.

“A new, highly-skilled workforce will emerge as the Industrial Internet is poised to have a significant impact,” the report says.  The innovations discussed in the paper will “augment and enhance the abilities of workers, enabling them to work with greater efficiency, better results, and greater productivity,” and turning “industrial operators into skilled information-workers,” the report says.

Annunziata and Evans write about these future human-machine collaborations this way: “Workers will be racing with the new, intelligent machines of the Industrial Internet, not against them—more Iron Man than the Charlie Chaplin of Modern Times.”

- See more at: http://www.ideaslaboratory.com/2013/10/08/report-industrial-internet-leads-to-profound-transformation-in-way-humans-work/#sthash.VkagAxiu.dpuf
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